US Citizens with a Spanish cultural background


This blog is dedicated to the millions of Puerto Ricans (or better say, boricuas) who struggle on a small Caribbean island to achieve real democracy and decent standards of living for themselves and their children.

I would like to begin by sharing some photographs I found on a blog from the New York Times by Ukrainian-born American documentary photographer Jack Delano.

Barbershop, Bayamon. 1941. Jack Delano

Barbershop, Bayamon. 1941. Jack Delano

Beggar, San Juan. 1941. Jack Delano

Beggar, San Juan. 1941. Jack Delano

Parking lot, Plaza Las Americas Mall, San Juan. 1981. Jack Delano

Parking lot, Plaza Las Americas Mall, San Juan. 1981. Jack Delano

Tourists, Old San Juan. 1989. Jack Delano

Tourists, Old San Juan. 1989. Jack Delano

Don Toli in retirement. Near Guayanilla. 19??. Jack Delano

Don Toli in retirement. Near Guayanilla. 19??. Jack Delano

Emiliano Pacheco Vega (Don Toli) as young caneworker, near Guayanilla. 1946, Jack Delano

Emiliano Pacheco Vega (Don Toli) as young caneworker, near Guayanilla. 1946, Jack Delano.
General Archive of the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture
With the U.S. occupation, sugar came to dominate Puerto Rico’s economy an was grown on the coastal plains in the north, south, east, and west.

Sugarcane workers, resting at noon. Rio Piedras 1941, Jack Delano

Sugarcane workers, resting at noon. Rio Piedras 1941, Jack Delano
Library of Congress

Tenant farmers, town unknown. 1941 or 1942, Jack Delano

Tenant farmers, town unknown. 1941 or 1942, Jack Delano
Library of Congress
Homes, usually two rooms with a partial shelter on one side for a wood stove and an outside latrine or no toilet, had either no light or a kerosene lamp. Water was carried from nearby springs.

San Juan to Ponce train. 1946. Jack Delano

San Juan to Ponce train. 1946. Jack Delano
General Archive of the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture

San Juan to Ponce train. 1946. Jack Delano

San Juan to Ponce train. 1946. Jack Delano

Suggarcane cutter, Guanica. 1941, Jack Delano

Suggarcane cutter, Guanica. 1941, Jack Delano

Coffee picker, near Corozal. 1941, Jack Delano

Coffee picker, near Corozal. 1941, Jack Delano
Most Haciendas paid the required minumum wage for coffee labor and for major tasks.

Pledging allegiance, Corozal. 1946, Jack Delano

Pledging allegiance, Corozal. 1946, Jack Delano

San Juan to Ponce train. 1946. Jack Delano

San Juan to Ponce train. 1946. Jack Delano

San Juan to Ponce train. 1946. Jack Delano

San Juan to Ponce train. 1946. Jack Delano

Escambron Beach Club, San Juan 1941. Jack Delano

Escambron Beach Club, San Juan 1941. Jack Delano

Farm laborer's family, near San German. 1942. Jack Delano

Farm laborer’s family, near San German. 1942. Jack Delano

Barrio Rabina, Cidra. 1982. Jack Delano

Barrio Rabina, Cidra. 1982. Jack Delano

Condado, San Juan. 1989. Jack Delano

Condado, San Juan. 1989. Jack Delano

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4 Responses to US Citizens with a Spanish cultural background

  1. ratonet says:

    Reblogged this on Se destetó Teté and commented:

    A couple of weeks ago, I decided to start a new blog. This time, dedicated to he millions of US Citizens living on the island of Puerto Rico and who struggle for democracy and for better living conditions.
    I hope you like it as much as I enjoy writing it.

    Like

  2. Ratonet says:

    Homes, usually two rooms with a partial shelter on one side for a wood stove and an outside latrine or no toilet, had either no light or a kerosene lamp. Water was carried from nearby springs.

    Like

  3. Ratonet says:

    Generally the whole family was expected to work for the hacienda, with women and children harvesting coffee, some women doing domestic word, and children running errands.

    Like

  4. Ratonet says:

    Sugar cane, the more profitable cash crops, was grown on the fertile lowlands fo the Caguas Valley.

    Like

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