Xmas in Puerto Rico


The content and length of the Christmas celebration are much different from that in the United States. Parrandas or Trullas Navideñas, very common during Christmas, are basically large moving parties in which a musical serenade is brought to a friend’s or family member’s home. In exchange for good music and the company of friends, the home owner welcomes the group into the house and gives them food and drink. The traditional Christmas foods are lechón asado (roast pig), arroz con gandules (rice with pigeon peas), pasteles (a mixture of yucca and plantain stuffed with beef, pork, or chicken and wrapped in banana leaves); and, for dessert,  coquito (Puerto Rican coconut eggnog) and arroz con dulce (rice flavored with coconut milk and spices sweetened with brown sugar). Nochebuena, the night before Christmas, has always been celebrated. (Cf. Pedro A. Malavet, America’s Colony. The Political and Cultural Conflict between the United States and Puerto Rico (New York, NY: New York University Press, 2004), 109.)

Parrandas or Trullas Navideñas, very common during Christmas, are basically large moving parties in which a musical serenade is brought to a friend's or family member's home

Parrandas or Trullas Navideñas, very common during Christmas, are basically large moving parties in which a musical serenade is brought to a friend’s or family member’s home. (Taken from http://www.elboricua.com/)

The perfect Puerto Rican Christmas plate: Holiday food in Puerto Rico means a season of eating some very specific dishes, including lechon (whole roasted pig); pasteles (root vegetable tamales); morcilla (blood sausage); arroz con gandules (rice with pigeon peas); and guineos en escabeche (green bananas marinated in vinegar).

The perfect Puerto Rican Christmas plate: Holiday food in Puerto Rico means a season of eating some very specific dishes, including lechon (whole roasted pig); pasteles (root vegetable tamales); morcilla (blood sausage); arroz con gandules (rice with pigeon peas); and guineos en escabeche (green bananas marinated in vinegar). (From http://blog.zagat.com/)

 

This entry was posted in English, Miscellaneous and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Xmas in Puerto Rico

  1. Orlando says:

    Love your blog. Its always good to learn more about the Puerto Rico. Some years ago My family started celebrating “3 Kings Day” a more traditional Spanish holiday. It has become part of my another way for my family to be together and remember the traditions of the Puerto Rico. I remember the stories my dad used to tell us of his childhood as a poor family living in the mountains of Lares. he would say that they had to cut a little bit of grass and put it in a shoe box under their bed. The grass was to feed the camels of the 3 kings and they would leave some type of toy.

    Like

    • -- says:

      Hey, many thanks for writing. It’s nice to know that there’s still people reading my blog out there.
      Also, thanks for sharing your story related to the Trhee Wise Men.I would have never thought of leaving grass for the cammels, I found this extremely interesting. As a child I used to leave my shoes under the tree. Dad said that if I misbehaved during the year, I would wake up and find my shoes in the same place I left them as a sign of punishment. Otherwise, I would find a toy instead.

      Thanks for sharing. Greetings from Paris, Fr.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s